Bryony Hopkins | A Belly Full Of

I’VE GOT GUTS. IBD Awareness Week Q&A

This is something I’ve been promising for a while and I’m so sorry it’s taken me so long to compile! I first came up with the idea of doing a Q&A on living with IBD in the summer, having been asked a series of similar questions in my DMs for sometime. I wanted to create the post then but I quickly got quite sick afterwards (with my Crohns, classic!) and I didn’t feel like I could write all the answers I wanted to without compromising my mental health. Being open and honest can take it’s toll sometimes, and I seem to find it a lot easier to write about my experiences when I’ve come out the other side – rather than when I’m in the middle!

However, I am so passionate about raising awareness of this wretched illness and so I thought Crohns and Colitis Awareness Week was the perfect time to finally bring this Q&A to fruition. I am constantly overwhelmed by the amazing messages I receive in my inbox and so I really hope this article helps answer some of the most common questions I get. All of these have come in the form of comments or DMs and I really hope it’s useful.

Of course, before we get into this I should say I am NOT a medical professional and so everything I share below is anecdotal and first person experience. I am merely sharing my experiences and if you ever want to change your own diet, or medication, you should always consult your doctor first. IBD is different for every single person and so you should always be mindful that works for me, may not necessarily work for you.

So let’s launch in! This is a long one… so feel free to jump down to see which questions interest you most. I’ve addressed diet, alcohol, social life, work, diagnosis, surgery, medication and much more!

What is IBD?

IBD stands for Inflammatory Bowel Disease, which is an umbrella term for Ulcerative Colitis and Crohns Disease. IBD is an autoimmune disease, which means your body attacks itself and it’s a chronic illness (life-long and ongoing, there is no ‘cure’) The main symptoms are stomach pain, diarrhoea, fatigue, mouth ulcers, loss of appetite and anaemia. IBD can also cause arthritis, joint pain, abscesses, fistulas and eye inflammation. You can be in remission from drugs or surgery and it impacts over 300,000 in the UK alone.

What is an ostomy?

Sometimes, surgery is needed to treat Crohns Disease or Ulcerative Colitis. There are many different types of surgery, which you can find more about here.  In some cases it is necessary to form an ‘ostomy’, which is basically a re-routing of your digestion system. It requires forming a stoma, which is when they bring your intestine out of the stomach and an ostomy bag is attached to collect the waste. More info here.

When were you diagnosed?

I was diagnosed when I was four years old, so literally 22 years ago now. I was on holiday in Wales with my family when I started experiencing some awful symptoms – running to the bathroom and losing a lot of blood. I don’t remember an awful lot about it to be honest, as I was so young and I know lots of people can remember way more about their diagnosis than I can. But I was whisked to a main hospital in Wales where I stayed for a few nights before I was well enough to be transferred immediately to a paediatric gastro specialist unit (the John Radcliffe in Oxford). I essentially completely skipped primary care because I was so poorly, and so young, and my consultant quickly diagnosed me with Crohns Disease.

What were your initial symptoms before diagnosis?

I find this such a hard question to answer because I was so little! A lot of my early childhood with the disease was quite traumatic, so I don’t remember an awful lot. All I do remember from when I was 4 years old was going to the loo A LOT, looking down the toilet bowl and seeing scarlet blood. I lost a lot of weight, was in a lot of pain and therefore it was a pretty swift diagnosis for me.

How did you feel about surgery and talking openly about it?

I had my first operation when I was 12 years old and to be honest, I was absolutely desperate for them to remove my large bowel because I was really so poorly. Even though I knew that meant I would have to live with a temporary ileostomy, I was just so sick of constantly being in pain, not being able to be more than 2 minutes away from a toilet and feeling constantly like I was functioning at 30%. I missed heaps of school, barely socialised and was either blown up like a balloon on steroids or on a liquid diet. There was no other options and surgery literally gave me my life back. That being said, I was of course still a child, so there were many people around me who also had a say in the decision, including my family and the doctors. After the ileostomy surgery and subtotal colectomy, my life was transformed. I went on school trips, parties, holidays – I was suddenly able to do it all. I didn’t however, have the ability to speak openly about it.

I don’t think I felt confident enough to talk about it until I left university at 21. So that was about 9 years after my first operation which removed my bowel – and it was 5 years after I had my ileostomy reversed (that happened when I was 16). I think there were many turning points in my ability to articulate what I’d gone through and how I felt about it. One was meeting my partner, Josh, who has given me more confidence in myself than I probably ever admit! And the second was entering my career and meeting amazing friends at university who accepted everything about who I was and loved me for it. Learning to be open about my surgery has been a process over years and years – and many people, including my family, Josh and my friends, have helped me get there. I never could have imagined at the age of 16 and even 20, that I’d be writing this all down for anyone to read!

In a nutshell (this has turned into a rather long answer!), the journey for every single person is completely different. And you shouldn’t feel like you need to share anything until you’re ready.

Bryony Hopkins

Straight after surgery in 2014, one of many

What was it like living with an ileostomy?

It was…. challenging! But also, amazing because my quality of life improved dramatically. I think it’s important to remember that I had my ileostomy between the ages of 13 and 16 – which is literally the most critical time of your life when it comes to figuring out who you are, how you feel about your body and establishing self confidence. Therefore my memories of how I felt about it are very much skewed by the feelings I had as I went through puberty and so it was quite a negative experience for me in terms of accepting my body. I know however that if I was to need an ileostomy in the future (which is fully possible), I would find it a lot easier to accept because I am so much more confident and comfortable in my own skin. Also the online community is just AMAZING now (which didn’t exist when I had an ostomy!). Two amazing accounts I would recommend are Billie and Where’s My Ostomy.

How do you deal with your scars?

Again, my journey to accepting my scars has taken years! It took me a long time to accept my scarred tummy but now I fully embrace it. The amount of times I have been so poorly I could barely get out of bed, it seems totally mad not to celebrate how much my body has overcome and my scars are part of that story. Of course sometimes I still have self conscious days like anyone else and sometimes when I’m on holiday that centres around my scars. Being in a solid relationship has definitely helped my body confidence, as well as going on girlie holidays and realising mostly people don’t give you a second glance! I’ve written a lot more about scars here and here.

Bryony Hopkins | A Belly Full Of

Proud of my scars, after many years of hiding them away

What medication have you taken?

I have think at some point or another, I have tried nearly everything! When I was first diagnosed as a child I was on a cocktail of extremely high dose prednisolone steroids, mesalazine – and also went on to try Infliximab and Budesonide. I was on azathiaprine for a long time as a teenager. I’ve been on multiple drugs to treat nausea specifically including ondssatron and cyclizine. I’ve also been treated for bacterial overgrowth with big antibiotics and a anal abscess which also required surgery and big old antibiotics. I’ve had the tablets, suppositories, foam – literally every way you can minister drugs, I’ve done it!

Right now I am unfortunately in a little flare up – and I take humira injections once a week (which I do myself) and I’m also taking prednisolone suppositories (THE GLAM LIFE GUYZ).

How do you stay so positive?

The honest answer is that I don’t stay positive all the time – in fact, when the disease is at it’s worse I really am an emotional wreck. Having said that, perhaps it’s just the length of time I’ve dealt with it, I’ve learnt that negative thoughts and feelings don’t actually assist in me feeling any better about things. I have long found that positive thoughts breeds positivity around you – and I am so lucky that I have that in my whole support network. I almost always have someone coming with me to hospital appointments, so I’m never alone for the good or the bad news, and I talk about it A LOT with my Mum, Dad and Josh. Being able to talk about it means I am able to rationalise things and essentially, just get on my daily life!

My emotions are permanently at the surface though and I cry at just about everything (I cried at an advert for a Christmas light switch on last night and I cry at FRIENDS episodes even when I know the outcome!) I guess my best advice is to talk, cry and moan when you need to and do things that make you feel good. For me this is my work, my social life, travel, yoga and reading a good book!

Bryony Hopkins | A Belly Full Of

Incredibly lucky that I have visited some amazing places, including San Fran

Why did you decide to go gluten and dairy free?

I went gluten and dairy free after I completed a 4 week liquid elemental diet to treat a particularly bad flare up of Crohns. It was actually the whole reason the blog was born – and you can see lots of my recipes + my liquid diet story on the ‘A Belly Full of Crohns’ tab.  Afterwards you have to reintroduce slowly on the LOFFLEX diet and during that process I found my stomach pains and bloating significantly reduced when I took dairy and gluten out of my diet. The whole process was supported by my specialist consultant and a dietician.

Everyone is different so of course eliminating these things from your diet won’t help everyone, and other people find other diets work, but this seems to have done me okay for the past couple of years! Being gluten and dairy free does NOT mean I am cured or symptom free. Unfortunately it is quite the opposite, I find gluten and dairy only really helps with bloating and some pain. My Crohns has a mind of it’s own and will play up anyway, meaning even if I am totally free-from these things, I still have mad toilet rushes and lots of pain.

How does alcohol impact your Crohns?

Alcohol seems to constantly impact my Crohns in different ways – and it largely depends how active the disease is and how I’m feeling overall! For example, in a flare up right now I am finding alcohol a massive irritant. Previously when I have been in remission, I found I can tolerate alcohol. This one really is a moving feast and I know everyone with IBD will have a different experience or way of dealing with it. I know some people with IBD who don’t drink at all – and I totally respect that. I personally prefer to judge it based on how I’m feeling. When I’m poorly I’ll avoid – when I’m feeling well, I will enjoy a drink.

Bryony Hopkins | A Belly Full Of

Burger + prosecco = YUM

How do you maintain a social life?

I think I manage to maintain a social life because I have such amazing, understanding friends! They will however probably all tell you I am a massive flake – as I do have a habit of over committing myself and then cancelling when I feel overwhelmed and exhausted. Luckily they are all incredibly understanding, for which I am grateful every single day!

Having a social life with IBD can be extremely challenging though and I have gone through periods where I have cancelled everything because I’m not well. These periods can feel lonely and isolating – and my best piece of advice here is to try and get friends and family to come and visit you. Movie nights and meals at home are perfect for this. Phone calls also are a great way of keeping in contact, even if you don’t have the energy to make it out the house. Being open helps too, so friends know that you are cancelling on account of your health – not because you just can’t be arsed. And any friends who judge you or make it difficult for you – ain’t worth your time.

How does your partner deal with your IBD?

I feel like Josh should really be answering this – but I know it is a constant challenge for him too. No-one wants to see their partner in pain but he is unbelievably positive, always making me laugh at hospital appointments and at my bedside. I know that it takes its toll. I think I should get him to write a proper answer to this!

Bryony Hopkins | A Belly Full Of

He actually hates social media – but he is my absolute rock

Did you tell your workplace about your Crohns and how did you go about it?

This has been a right old journey for me too since I left university, because there is no handbook in ‘telling your employee you have Crohns’! (Ok actually this resource on Crohns and Colitis website is actually pretty good, I wish I had found it when I was first entering my career!) I did tell my current workplace when I first joined and I’m really pleased I did – as two years later I ended up needing surgery and was off for 10 weeks. I think being honest and open as you can really helps reduce your own stress around needing time off for sick days and appointments etc. I enter into every new job with openness about it, but it ultimately always helps me too. This year I even reduced my hours to help manage my fatigue and they were amazing about it – I think because I had that open and honest conversation. It’s difficult for sure, but it does get easier.

Bryony Hopkins | A Belly Full Of

I work in journalism, which sometimes requires very early starts! Here’s me on the radio at 4am!

Does shift work mess with your tummy and how do you deal with it?

Yes it does!! Working as a journalist in a 24 hour newsroom means I have worked earlies and lates and it really messes with my tummy. In all honesty, the only way I have dealt with it is to be open with work and minimise the amount of shift work I actually do. Sometimes I do radio shows which require a 2am alarm and that will always impact my tummy for the rest of the day. I know a few people have messaged me to say they have felt the same – so unfortunately it seems to be a thing!

Do you find probiotics help your IBD symptoms?

Yes and no! I’ll hold my hands up and say I haven’t tried lots of different probiotics and I still find the whole topic quite overwhelming and confusing – especially when it comes to my well and truly messed up gut! I have recently been taking Symprove, which I have found helps with my bloating and pain on a daily basis. However having been on Symprove ,I’ve still had a flare-up – which shows how stubborn the disease can be. I’m not an expert in probiotics and I won’t pretend to be but I do find this one helps balance things out for me.

I’ve just been diagnosed and I’m so scared and overwhelmed. What advice do you have to dealing with this?

This is probably the most common question I get into my DM! Being diagnosed is completely overwhelming and can be totally terrifying (especially when I know people can be misdiagnosed with IBS for months and even years, beforehand). My best advice is to get yourself into secondary care as soon as you can and don’t be afraid to ask your consultant every single question on your mind. The online community is amazing and there are so many blogs and resources out there now, for you to read other people’s experiences. It’s SO important to remember that every single case of IBD is different though, so although it’s great to read other people’s stories so you know you’re not alone, it’s important that everyone’s journey is different. I would thoroughly recommend reading the information on the Crohns and Colitis Website – they have incredible resources.

If you’ve got this far – thank you for staying with me! I really hope it has gone some way to answer some of your questions <3

Bryony Hopkins A Belly Full of Food www.abellyfullof.com

 

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Last night I posted a spontaneous story sharing how I was feeling as I go through a bad patch with my Crohns Disease. What started as a raw moment of honesty ended up with me somehow ended up going off on a tangent, stating the fact I still take medication for my Crohns Disease and I am not ashamed to say so. The replies and outpouring of people thanking me for being so honest was incredible. A couple of people told me they had fought against taking medication themselves, because it seems like a ‘goal’ to be med free and this got me thinking. What world do we live in that there is a whole tribe of people boycotting medical intervention? And not only that, there are people on social media who are willing to tell us we are wrong to take medicines, based on absolutely no scientific evidence? In fact, in response to the story I posted I received a message telling me I should try another natural remedy and if I did, I wouldn’t need medication. That literally sums up the entirety of the problem we are facing. It really has me scratching my head and feeling desperately sad and worried about the way the ‘wellness’ word is shaping how we feel about meds…

It seems bizarre to me that I even have to state that it’s okay to take medication when you have a chronic illness and when I said it on my Instagram story; I really wasn’t expecting such a reaction. Inflammatory Bowel Disease is an autoimmune, which literally means your body is attacking itself. It is completely irresponsible to think that no medical intervention for such a venomous disease is needed. This has really made me quite concerned that anyone reading or finding my story online might be lead to believe that I have ‘cured’ my Crohns through diet alone, because this is absolutely factually incorrect. I won’t recap my life story, but please do read my whole Crohns story here.
So here are the facts. I have been on medication pretty consistently and in some form since I was four years old, even since I have done my liquid diet and since I had my ileostomy reversed. I take humira injections every fortnight and I have just finished a course of mesalasine suppositories for constant bleeding (these are unpleasant, think of pills that go up instead of down!) I take Ondansetron on days when I feel so nauseous I might pass out, a drug which is used for cancer patients and I have done all of these things since I went totally gluten and dairy free, and since I upheaved my lifestyle.

Bryony Hopkins

No amount of dairy or gluten free would have meant I didn’t need the surgery I have needed.

So what is it about wellness and health on social media that has led us to feel like we should be ashamed of taking medication? And why have even I, at points, felt like a failure because I still have to take medication alongside my dietary and lifestyle changes, otherwise my intestine literally might disintegrate? This is such a hard question to answer but I think its two main reasons.

  1. We know of several hugely successful health bloggers and Instagrammers who have made their fortune based on ‘curing’ their chronic illness through diet. Whilst they may not have directly said they don’t take meds, it has lurched us towards this ideology that it is possible for us all to achieve this goal, whilst we forget that every single one of us is completely different and unique.
  2. We want a message that is clear and simple. I.e. – ‘you can put your IBD into remission if you’re gluten free’ or ‘if you’re vegan you won’t suffer from your psoriasis’. These claims are wildly dangerous and not evidence based BUT they are clear, and so they gain attraction. It’s the same as a punchy news headline. The message ‘I am gluten and dairy free but I also take injections, and suppositories and anti-sickness tablets and to honest sometimes I still don’t feel great’, is a less eye-catching strapline.

So where does this leave us? It leaves us angry, defensive and confused. I should say at this point that I honestly believe I have radically changed my quality of life due to making some diet changes, but has my Crohns gone? Of course not. Am I still on medication? Yes. And what happens if I stop my medication? Well, things fall apart pretty quickly. I believe diet is an absolutely integral part of dealing with a disease which manifests in the gut, but I feel angry and upset that social media has led us to a point where we feel like we can boycott medical intervention because someone slid into our DMs to tell us better.

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I have tried every treatment, up heaved my lifestyle and still rely on meds. That’s just IBD!

So if you’re reading this and follow me, I really hope you know and appreciate that I enforce all dietary and lifestyle changes alongside medical advice recommended by your doctor. Sometimes of course, we make our own decisions regarding medication/surgery/treatment – but this isn’t me saying to ignore the advice of medical professionals. And if you take medication to stay on track of your life, then own it! The clear message here is that every single one of us is completely individual and unique. What works for one person, might not work for another, especially with a disease as complicated as IBD, and so we should remember that when we are flicking through social media.  Anyone can say anything these days – so make sure you are getting your information from a reliable source.
Do I hope one day I might not need medication to keep me well? Of course. But I just want to live a full and healthy life – and at the moment, my meds help me do that (most of the time!)
As one of my wise followers DM’ed me ‘If diet was the answer to cure IBD, we would all be well!’
BRYONY HOPKINS, A BELLY FULL OF BRYONY

bryonyhopkins

Eating out when you’re gluten free, dairy free, soy free or any other kind of free can be stressful – I’ve already had to become that person who reviews menus before I will confirm I can attend said restaurant! Navigating the menu is just the starting point, then discovering that the waiter/waitress doesn’t actually know what’s in the sauce, or if the fish is fried in butter makes the ordeal so awkward, you think you may as well just stay at home.
BUT NEVER FEAR! I am on a one stop mission to find the best hidden gems of allergy eating in London. See my previous post with four other amazing restaurants Eating out – May favourites– and these next three are a real treat!
WAG Free Kitchen
Price range: £
When my boyfriend proposed this for dinner, I raised my eyebrows too. Why are you taking me to a ‘WAG’ Free Kitchen? Of course, WAG in fact stands for ‘Wheat and Gluten’ and I’m so glad he discovered this buried in the listings of Time Out’s Top Gluten Free restaurants. It’s in Brixton market, a tiny shop with probably only around 10 or 12 tables. The menu was simple British food with a Brazilian twist – burgers, chicken escalope, fresh soups and quinao salads – something for everyone!

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WAG’s venison burger

As soon as I saw the menu I knew I had to take advantage of the rarity of gluten free bread, so I went straight in for the venison burger with crispy wedges, home made mayo and a gluten free bun. It was gorgeous – so simple and so delicious. I was told they usually have a chef there who makes the gluten free bread fresh on site – but unfortunately he was on holiday when we visited. This of course means I have to go back again to try it! At £20 a head, including a Brazilian caipirinha and a gluten free beer for the boyf, this is a totally affordable dinner destination.
NAMA
Price range: £££
NAMA is the home of the raw – artisan raw to be precise. Everything on the menu is totally vegan, gluten free and raw, which means nothing is heated above 46C. Tucked in a small street about ten minutes walk away from Notting Hill, it isn’t in the most easy to find location but the trek is totally worth it. I was firstly impressed by the menu and the descriptions of every dish, for example you can take your pick of ‘Pizza’ or ‘Italian Pizza’, or even ‘Pad Thai’ – old favourites with a raw twist. Originally a small cafe, NAMA is only open for dinner Thursday to Saturday and I attended with a friend who knew the restaurant well.
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On recommendation I went for the Italian pasta – courgette noodles tossed in tomato sauce, with marinaded mushrooms, caramelised onions, black olives, sundried tomatoes and almond parmesan – sounds amazing right?? We also ordered the kale salad as a side to share. Both dishes were delicious and it was definitely an experience eating raw dishes that shared so many similarities with classic dishes I love. The kale salad was so good we ordered another!! Although to be honest, the real highlight of the meal was dessert. A blueberry cheesecake – they’re most popular dish. IT WAS AMAZING! So unbelievably smooth and creamy. I would go back a thousand times over for that cheesecake.
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The creme de la creme of NAMA

At around £35 a head, this is at the upper end of allergy eating and I have to say, I found myself hungry again later in the evening. I would go back to try some of the other dishes but be prepared to spend more – and I would pick this as a perfect cake and coffee place!
Indigo at One Aldwych 
Price range: ££££
Indigo at central London hotel One Aldwych was a find whilst watching Masterchef (yes, I am equally obsessed with watching food programmes). It is a completely dairy free and gluten free restaurant and I was so excited to try it when I saw the celebrities create some of their dishes on the most recent series.
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Starters and main course

The menu is full of so many British classics – gnocci, pasta, fish and chips and steak. We went for lunch set menu, which came to £27 for three courses. I chose the rabbit terrine whilst my Mum had the smoked mackerel gravalax. The rabbit terrine was good – if not a little dry but Mum’s mackerel was delicious. Extremely delicate and tasty, although the portion was tiny! The highlight of this meal was definitely the main course – my steak bavette with fondant potatoes was cooked to perfection and Mum’s aubergine cannelloni was divine. The presentation was incredible, such intricate designs in the courgette flower arranged on top of the rolls, stuffed with a light mushroom tapenade.
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Aubergine cannelloni

Unfortunately the desserts were not as sublime as NAMA – I had a blueberry panna cotta which was light and coconutty and I was happy to finish the lot off. My Mum had a ‘apricot fool’, which turned out to be a very underwhelming coulis with coconut yogurt.
With a glass of prosecco and a mint tea to finished, the bill came to an eye watering £50 a head but it was a overall delicious meal in a gorgeous hotel atmosphere. I would definitely return and would be intrigued to try some of the dishes off the set menu, including the gnocci and the beer battered fish.
Happy allergy dining!!!
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bryonyhopkins

This is a skill that I have been forced to learn – and boy, has it taken some years. Arguably, learning to listen to your body is the most important step to keeping

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I was completely in tune with my body when I decided to take on the liquid diet. I knew it was the best option for me over steroids.

your body and soul happy and healthy. Yet most people I have spoken to admit they do know their body and the warning signs when things are about to go south – but they struggle to actually do anything about it. Listening to your body is completely useless unless you actually respond to it. Responding is pivotal- and really can work wonders (I am living proof of this!) Let me explain.
What do you mean when you say ‘listen to your body’?
Listening to your body is being in tune with your physical and emotional needs, and learning what you can do to feed and nourish them. On a basic level, this is eating when you’re hungry; sleeping when you’re tired. Yet there are so many levels above this and learning to hear them is a source of great power. It is fact that your body will always give you signs when it is struggling. That niggling cold for example, is the first sign that your body is in distress. Those tears you shed, is a sign that your soul is sad. Equally, it will also tell you when it is flourishing – those endorphins when you see the person you love or the excitement at an upcoming trip or event. Whilst this may seem blindingly obvious – why do we so often ignore these signs? The answer is one word – life.
Life is busy. Too busy. We work hard and long hours. We are constantly tapped into the digital world; social media, work emails, news outlets and celebrity culture. So it is unsurprising that amongst all this noise, our bodies are ignored. It’s boring to rest/take downtime/acknowledge home truths that require unwanted action.
I will hold my hands up and admit I have been the queen of ignoring my body in the past – particularly during university. This has resulted in some disastrous outcomes – including weeks laid up in bed due to fatigue, surgery, flare ups and on one particularly memorable occasion, contracting Mumps (despite having had the jab!!) My body was tired and vulnerable. Unfortunately, that is just through working hard and having a social life. A home truth which I still find extremely hard to acknowledge.
How do I respond to my body?
On feeling warning signs it’s important to evaluate what you can do to stop things escalating. If you have the beginnings of a cold, take time to rest and make sure you get lots of sleep. If you’re feeling tearful – acknowledge why you’re feeling sad and what you can do about it. Unhappy in your job? Find ways to love it or move. Unhappy in your relationship? Address it or leave. Find something that gives you some ME time – yoga, mindfulness, running or cooking. Whilst my examples may be extreme and you probably won’t end up having surgery if you ignore your body, you may end up getting sick, physically or emotionally – and why let it get to that?
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Taking time out on holiday is one my fave ways to unwind and refresh (unfortunately, my bank balance doesn’t allow this to happen as regularly as I’d like!)

I now know that I have to rest when I start getting warning signs – and sometimes I still get it wrong. I have just had to take four days of enforced rest as my body started rejecting all my food – a tell tale sign for me that my body is at breaking point. Utterly exhausted, I knew that if I had pushed through it (which I so often did at university), I would have ended up in a far worse position than just a couple of days off work.
The first step
Is to figure out what makes your body tick and what your body needs to bloom. This could be SO MANY THINGS! It could be a particular diet or exercise. It could be a hobby or spending time with particular people. It could be working a job you love, going on an amazing trip or having a social media detox. In deciphering this – you will also find the things that your body struggles with.For me, it is relentless work and social plans, meaning I have to prioritise how I spend my energy and know when it is time to stop. It is also eating foods that work for me and knowing that my health is THE most important thing. Even more important than the party I really really want to go to!
 
Believe me – I don’t say any of this lightly. It is difficult – but so worth it if you can find your body formula.
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bryonyhopkins

Breakfast is by far my favourite meal of the day and pre diet revolution I was a fry up fiend. Given the unbelievable breakfast offering at my work canteen, I was regularly consuming eggs, bacon, sausage, beans and hash browns (oh godddd it was so good!). It was my utter guilty pleasure.
The only thing I love more than breakfast is brunch. Get me eggs benedict, scrambled eggs with smoked salmon and a well ingredient-ed omelette and I am on happy girl.
So when I started my new diet, I had to find ways to satisfy my breakfast obsession. I’m going to share with you three of my favourite recipes – the vegetarian fry up and two blissful smoothie bowls. God bless the smoothie bowl!!
The clean fry up
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This recipe is vegetarian, gluten free and dairy free.
Ingredients (Serves 1)
Handful of cherry tomatoes
One gluten free bagel/muffin
One egg (or two if you’re hungry!)
One avocado
Handful of kale
Hanful of chesnut mushrooms
One garlic clove
Olive oil
Method
Start by peeling your avocado from the skin and mashing – put this to one side. Then slice up your cherry tomatoes and mushrooms and shred your kale from the stalks. Finely chop a clove of garlic.
Fill a saucepan of water and put it on the hob to simmer. This is for your poached egg – so don’t let it boil!
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Take a fresh egg and pour it into a cup or ramekin, so the White of the egg swirls around the yolk.
Whilst your water warms up, add a glug of olive oil to a frying pan on a medium heat. Allow the oil to warm, before adding your chopped garlic.
Now your water should be simmering at a steady level (turn the heat down if needed to prevent boiling). Pour your egg into the water and put 3 minutes on your timer.
Now add the cherry tomatoes, kale and mushrooms to the garlic and oil mix in your frying pan. Lightly sauté.
Pop your muffin or bagel in the toaster. After three minutes your egg and tomato/kale/mushroom mix should be done! Take all off the heat.
Top your toasted muffin with the avocado, and use a slotted spoon to ease your poached egg out of the water. Put this on top of your avo muffin.
Serve with the garlic-y mushroom, kale and cherry tomatoes. YUMMMMMMM!
The very berry smoothie bowl
I only discovered the smoothie bowl post liquid diet and I genuinely found it revolutionary. I am a huge fan of smoothies, but often don’t find them filling enough. I also love crunchy granola and fruit salad, but often find them dry or plain now I can’t have yogurt. The smoothie bowl combines all these elements and makes an extremely filling breakfast. IMG_3929 (1)The trick is to make a thick smoothie and to balance the heaviest ingredients on top, to create a pretty pattern (not that this is essential for taste.. but it looks nice!) The best part is also that you can basically put WHATEVER YOU want on it – possibilities are endless. Here are two of my favourite combos.
Ingredients (Serves 1)
This recipe is gluten free, dairy free and vegan.
For the smoothie:
300 ml almond milk
Large handful of frozen berries (bag from supermarket)
One banana
Honey
For the toppings: Kiwi, gluten free granola, physalis and blueberries.
Method
This is so super simple. Whizz up your smoothie ingredients in a blender (I swear by my Nutribullet). Slice up your kiwi into medium slices. Pour your smoothie into a shallow ish bowl (not necessary – but helps with toppings sinking!). Arrange your toppings on top – sliced kiwi on the edge as it is the heaviest, follow up the sharp physalis, the crunchy granola and the blueberries. The best thing about this smoothie bowl is the combo of flavours and textures. A total winner!
The tropical smoothie bowl 
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This smoothie bowl will make you feel like you’ve done a one stop shop to the Caribbean! You’ll notice it uses many of the same ingredients as before – showing it is easy to make smoothie bowls on a budget by mixing and matching, whilst still creating new flavours.
Ingredients (Serves 1)
This recipe is gluten free, dairy free and vegan.
For the smoothie: 300ml almond milk
One banana
Large handful of frozen mango
One kiwi
Tbspn honey
For the toppings: strawberries, physalis, blueberries, gluten free granola and desiccated coconut.
Method: Same as above! Whizz together and arrange toppings on top of the smoothie. Start with heaviest on the outside and enjoy the gorgeous kiwi/mango smoothie with a taste of Caribbean coconut!
Let me know what you think!
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bryonyhopkins