Lots of people have been getting in touch recently asking for Crohn’s or IBD advice after being first diagnosed and I suddenly thought it would benefit others to write down my entire Crohn’s story – warts and all, from start to finish (well, to present!), for World IBD Day today. I was diagnosed at the age of four, and now at the age of 25, I’ve experienced A WHOLE BUNCH OF STUFF, including lots of abdominal surgery (yes, I’ve had a ileostomy) and medication. I sincerely hope that documenting some of my experiences may help others suffering from IBD, those who have just been diagnosed or just want to understand more about the illness. It’s a confusing and ever changing illness and I must stress that every single person with IBD is individual. What works for one person won’t work for another – there is no IBD ‘path’ – you just have to carve your own story! (So basically, don’t freak out if you’re newly diagnosed and reading this!)

So let’s start with diagnosis, and to be honest, I can keep this pretty brief, seeing as I was four years old and I really don’t remember much! I was on holiday with my family in Wales, when my parents noticed I was getting extremely pale, not eating, losing weight and going to the bathroom A LOT. On one horrible morning when my mum asked me how I was feeling, I told her I was losing blood. I went straight to a hospital in Wales, where I was admitted and quickly transferred over to an expert gastro unit in Oxford, where I was diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease. And that was the start of my IBD journey! I should add here that Crohn’s Disease is an autoimmune disease – it is your immune system malfunctioning.

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Let’s ignrore my questionable haircut and my brother’s weird face. On steroids in primary school

In simple terms, the body eats away at the digestive system, causing inflammation, ulcers and bleeding anywhere along the digestive tract. I was at my sickest as a child; I remember countless birthdays and Easters spent in hospital. My first treatment was steroids, which sent me completely bonkers and made me put on weight faster than an inflating balloon. My disease was ravaging my large intestine, and although the steroids worked for a short time, as soon as my dose was reduced, I would start to flare again – big time. I went through cycles of mesalazine, azathioprine and infliximab, but nothing would calm my angry insides.

When I was coming up to about ten years old, I went on my first liquid diet. By this point, the conversations about having to remove my large intestine had been floating around for some months now. It was pretty clear that the disease was extremely resistant– it wasn’t responding to any medication. The liquid diet consisted of drinking cartons of Elemental 028, a nutritional drink designed to be absorbed instantly into the body, with your gut having to do absolutely zero work. As I was about to enter puberty,

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I thought I wore it well tbf. At school age 11

I was required to consume even more of the liquid to ensure my growth wasn’t stunted. It was physically impossible to drink the required amount, and so I would sleep with a tube that went up my nose and into my stomach and the rest of the liquid would be pumped into my body. In the very early days of the liquid diet, it was so traumatising having the tube passed up my nose that I didn’t want to take it out – so I went to school with it. The psychological battle was immense, but the liquid diet was my most effective treatment yet.

Alas, a few weeks after I started eating again, the Crohn’s returned with vengeance and at the age of twelve, I had an ileostomy formed. By this point I was practically begging them to take my large intestine out – I was tired of being constantly sick and living this half life in and out of hospital. Still being so young, they were reluctant to actually remove it all, and hoped that bypassing it via the ileostomy would help it heal. It did not. Nine months later I was back under anaesthetic and had my entire large intestine removed – with the exception of a tiny bit at the rectum. This tiny bit of intestine turned out to be my saving grace. Due to the mechanics of the colon, because I still had that little bit left, there was a chance they could reconnect my small intestine with the end of my large intestine and a chance I could be bag free in the future. To be honest, I think this is what got me through. Although I was desperate to feel better, nothing could prepare me for the emotional and psychological difficulties of living with a bag whilst I was going through puberty. A teenager is self-conscious enough as it is right – without having to worry about part of your intestine sticking out of your stomach! The three years with an ileostomy are a blur now, but it dramatically changed my quality of life. I finally had my life back. I was able to function – I was able to go to school everyday. I was able to hang out with my friends. I didn’t have to take drugs, I could eat what I wanted and I wasn’t at the mercy of my disease anymore.

When I reached the age of sixteen, the ileostomy had done its job and I was rewarded with a bag reversal. Another major operation, reopening my entire 30cm scar and another scar left where the ileostomy once was, but I was completely liberated. FREE FROM A BAG! Lollzzzz but totally not free of Crohn’s. I was actually pretty healthy doing my ALevels and I secured my place at Loughborough University to do a degree in Drama with seeming ease (health wise at least!) I had the most amazing time at university, but during this time, the Crohn’s began to spread to the lower part of my rectum and small intestine, and so I was put on Humira – a weekly injection administered myself. This managed to get the Crohn’s under control, but by my second year I was struggling with repetitive obstructive symptoms. I was in and out of hospital, in and out of A & E, and it came to pass that they had to operate.

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After my sixth operation, I asked my Mum to take this to let me friends know I was ok. Two hours out of surgery, I have no recollection of this being taken!!

Again. They found and closed an internal hernia, as well as adhesions, which were causing the obstructions. A year and a half later, just as I was completing my finals, the obstructive symptoms started again and after a particular memorable experience where I lay in a hospital bed in Leicester, surrounded by my friends and boyfriend who had fled a night out to my aid, I was under the knife again. Looking back, it was perhaps the immense amount of partying (I’m only human!) that took place over these three years that led me to need these two ops. The toll to my body was great and as I was recovering from my fifth operation, I began to ask myself, would these operations EVER stop?

After recovering from this fifth op, I plodded on quite well for a while. I got myself a job at the BBC as a Researcher and plunged myself into the world of commuting and full time work. I’d be lying if I said it was easy, my body took a while to adjust to the exhaustion. After my 21st birthday, a hernia popped up on my scar. LO AND BEHOLD – ANOTHER OPERATION. By this time I was officially at breaking point with being opened up so many times. I remember vividly bursting into hysterical tears in front of the surgeon and asking him, ‘WHEN WILL THIS END?’ I like to think I am an extremely strong individual, but I just couldn’t take any more operations. The isolation of the 8 week recovery alone was enough to send me completely insane, let alone the physical shock of going through all that pain over and over again.

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Apols for the faint hearted here, but this was post my sixth op. You can see the little scar from my ileostomy too

I guess the positive of undergoing such repetitive surgery was becoming proud of my scar. It’s 30cm long, stretching from just below my chest to below my pelvis and it’s extremely visible. I wear it loud and proud now and I take the stares on the beach to mean, ‘wow – that girl must be made of steel!!’

I got to spring 2016, when I started to relapse again and I was given the choice, which lead me to start writing this blog in the first place. Sat in front of my gastro specialist, he told me I needed a quick treatment that was guaranteed to work – steroids. I couldn’t do it to my body- I couldn’t do it to my mental health! So I took on the one month liquid diet, which is where this blog was born. It was honestly the best thing I ever did and despite the mental battle, I came out feeling amazing. My skin was glowing and I appreciated the impact of what I put in my body more than ever. I reintroduced food gradually and found I was intolerant to whole food groups by keeping a food diary for weeks, which has further kept my tum happy. You can read my liquid diet journey here. In October, I learnt to meditate – a skill, which my paediatrician had tried to introduce to me during puberty. You can read more about my journey to meditation here.

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Ended up forming quite a bond with my liquid diet cartons

Since then I have taken a short nutrition course, started yoga classes and started experimenting with what I eat and how it feels in my tum. I feel so very grateful for the journey I have come on to where I am today. I whole-heartedly believe everything happens for a reason and my IBD journey was meant to lead me to where I am today. To stand tall, tell my story and be confident in who I am. Because there are thousands of stories like mine that aren’t being shared, or are being misunderstood. IBD ain’t glamorous. Heck, I’d enjoy a day where I didn’t think about my gut – but that is the reality for so many of us living with Crohn’s Disease or Ulcerative Colitis. This is what we live with and we plod on. We make mothers, fathers, partners, friends and colleagues and STILL battle the debilitating symptoms of IBD – with a smile. I dare anyone who is embarrassed or struggling to deal with their IBD to speak out, confide in a friends/family and realise YOU ARE STILL B****Y BRILLIANT. IBD will not rule your life.

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Living and loving life in Bali – wearing that scar loud and proud. YES I’VE BEEN TRAVELLING TOO!

If you’ve got to the end of this epically long post, then thank you so much for reading and I hope you have taken something from my story. I would welcome comments/feedback  (comment below!) and any of your stories. I would love to hear them all.

Happy World IBD Day!

*I know I haven’t just written a book, so to do a thank you sounds weird – but I can’t write this and not mention the amazing care I have received over my entire Crohn’s journey from the gastro team at John Radcliffe Hospital. They have always answered all my questions, listened to me when I have said no, given me VIP treatment and taken the best possible care of me. Brilliant, brilliant team.*

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Eating out when you’re gluten free, dairy free, soy free or any other kind of free can be stressful – I’ve already had to become that person who reviews menus before I will confirm I can attend said restaurant! Navigating the menu is just the starting point, then discovering that the waiter/waitress doesn’t actually know what’s in the sauce, or if the fish is fried in butter makes the ordeal so awkward, you think you may as well just stay at home.
BUT NEVER FEAR! I am on a one stop mission to find the best hidden gems of allergy eating in London. See my previous post with four other amazing restaurants Eating out – May favourites– and these next three are a real treat!
WAG Free Kitchen
Price range: £
When my boyfriend proposed this for dinner, I raised my eyebrows too. Why are you taking me to a ‘WAG’ Free Kitchen? Of course, WAG in fact stands for ‘Wheat and Gluten’ and I’m so glad he discovered this buried in the listings of Time Out’s Top Gluten Free restaurants. It’s in Brixton market, a tiny shop with probably only around 10 or 12 tables. The menu was simple British food with a Brazilian twist – burgers, chicken escalope, fresh soups and quinao salads – something for everyone!

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WAG’s venison burger

As soon as I saw the menu I knew I had to take advantage of the rarity of gluten free bread, so I went straight in for the venison burger with crispy wedges, home made mayo and a gluten free bun. It was gorgeous – so simple and so delicious. I was told they usually have a chef there who makes the gluten free bread fresh on site – but unfortunately he was on holiday when we visited. This of course means I have to go back again to try it! At £20 a head, including a Brazilian caipirinha and a gluten free beer for the boyf, this is a totally affordable dinner destination.
NAMA
Price range: £££
NAMA is the home of the raw – artisan raw to be precise. Everything on the menu is totally vegan, gluten free and raw, which means nothing is heated above 46C. Tucked in a small street about ten minutes walk away from Notting Hill, it isn’t in the most easy to find location but the trek is totally worth it. I was firstly impressed by the menu and the descriptions of every dish, for example you can take your pick of ‘Pizza’ or ‘Italian Pizza’, or even ‘Pad Thai’ – old favourites with a raw twist. Originally a small cafe, NAMA is only open for dinner Thursday to Saturday and I attended with a friend who knew the restaurant well.
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On recommendation I went for the Italian pasta – courgette noodles tossed in tomato sauce, with marinaded mushrooms, caramelised onions, black olives, sundried tomatoes and almond parmesan – sounds amazing right?? We also ordered the kale salad as a side to share. Both dishes were delicious and it was definitely an experience eating raw dishes that shared so many similarities with classic dishes I love. The kale salad was so good we ordered another!! Although to be honest, the real highlight of the meal was dessert. A blueberry cheesecake – they’re most popular dish. IT WAS AMAZING! So unbelievably smooth and creamy. I would go back a thousand times over for that cheesecake.
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The creme de la creme of NAMA

At around £35 a head, this is at the upper end of allergy eating and I have to say, I found myself hungry again later in the evening. I would go back to try some of the other dishes but be prepared to spend more – and I would pick this as a perfect cake and coffee place!
Indigo at One Aldwych 
Price range: ££££
Indigo at central London hotel One Aldwych was a find whilst watching Masterchef (yes, I am equally obsessed with watching food programmes). It is a completely dairy free and gluten free restaurant and I was so excited to try it when I saw the celebrities create some of their dishes on the most recent series.
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Starters and main course

The menu is full of so many British classics – gnocci, pasta, fish and chips and steak. We went for lunch set menu, which came to £27 for three courses. I chose the rabbit terrine whilst my Mum had the smoked mackerel gravalax. The rabbit terrine was good – if not a little dry but Mum’s mackerel was delicious. Extremely delicate and tasty, although the portion was tiny! The highlight of this meal was definitely the main course – my steak bavette with fondant potatoes was cooked to perfection and Mum’s aubergine cannelloni was divine. The presentation was incredible, such intricate designs in the courgette flower arranged on top of the rolls, stuffed with a light mushroom tapenade.
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Aubergine cannelloni

Unfortunately the desserts were not as sublime as NAMA – I had a blueberry panna cotta which was light and coconutty and I was happy to finish the lot off. My Mum had a ‘apricot fool’, which turned out to be a very underwhelming coulis with coconut yogurt.
With a glass of prosecco and a mint tea to finished, the bill came to an eye watering £50 a head but it was a overall delicious meal in a gorgeous hotel atmosphere. I would definitely return and would be intrigued to try some of the dishes off the set menu, including the gnocci and the beer battered fish.
Happy allergy dining!!!
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It’s been one whole month since I started eating again. ONE WHOLE MONTH! It’s alarming how fast the time has gone. It’s been a while since I’ve written a health update and some of you have been asking how I’m getting on.

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It’s been one whole month since this amazing jacket potato moment!

Well – I’m still introducing food! I have been quite brave in the past couple of weeks, introducing more meats and garnishes (hallelujah for garlic!) and even started testing eggs. I EVEN HAD A STEAK! It was totally delicious. My daily food diary has become a lot more diverse and I’m absolutely loving trying new things in the kitchen – I feel like I’ve found my calling! I have also enjoyed dining out at many of the lush dairy and gluten free cafes near work – central London perks! Look out for a blog post on this soon.
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Unbelievable start to the working week with this plate of loveliness from Ethos Foods. ALL vegan and gluten free – winning! 

I am of course, still 90% LOFFLEX and I haven’t even started trying more challenging food groups, such as gluten, dairy, oats, barley etc. I have been completely dairy free for over two years now, so I doubt I will even touch that in the introduction stage. I am so looking forward to working some more grains and breads into my diet though, if I can tolerate them. I love rice, but there are only so much rice products I can take!! (Rice Pasta, rice noodles, rice cakes, rice bread- rice rice!!) In my kitchen adventures I have found a few ways to make the LOFFLEX diet more interesting – and quickly! Click here for some simple LOFFLEX recipes.
Here’s what I’ve been eating on an average day so far:
0730 – Carton of elemental
0930 – Berry, spinach, peach and almond milk smoothie
1230 – 2 carob rice cakes (with a mint tea)
1330 – Lettuce, rice pasta, garlic, basil, prawns, spinach, roasted peppers and tomatoes.
1500 – Coconut curls
1700 – Carton of elemental
2000 – Crispy butterfly chicken, garlic greens and chive mash Click here for recipe.
2130 – Rice cake with soya/jam/honey
Rice making a strong feature as you can see – as well as the Elemental. It’s incredible how much my day to day life has benefited. I am no longer bloated, I am no longer in constant pain. I can move freely and wear jeans without worrying they’re going to be too tight on my stomach. These are all things I had considered to be ‘normal’ before – yet now, I don’t have to worry.
Unfortunately, there is a horribly harsh reality that I’m facing. Some of my most niggly symptoms still persist – we’re talking blood. Whilst I am basically pain free, there is still active Crohn’s Disease in my gut. To say I’m out of the woods would be a lie! And this is something I am still struggling to come to terms with – despite changing my entire lifestyle (conscious effort to sleep more, exercise more, drink less, eat lots of veggies!), it’s not budging immediately like I thought it would do.
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The elemental lives on!!!

I’ve also had to invest in a set of scales. Low fat living = weight loss. Weight loss + Crohns = bad news. Whilst I am secretly enjoying a flatter beach stomach, my consultant would scream if he saw I’d shed 6 lbs. (I am only little anyway!) In light of this, I also have to consciously make an effort to up my elemental intake to fill my body with more nutrients. Whilst my body continues to fight the disease (albeit, painlessly), I need as many nutrients as I can get!
 So what’s the plan for the active disease? Well – I don’t know yet. I am still taking a weekly shot of adlimumab and will continue to do so. At the beginning of the liquid diet the plan was to take Azathiaprine to keep me well in the long run. Unfortunately, this tablet contained a large amount of lactose that my stomach simply couldn’t tolerate. My next appointment with my consultant isn’t for a couple of weeks – so until then, I am keeping optimistic and hoping my new lifestyle will slowly work its magic. Whilst also reminding myself that I have made huge leaps and bounds since pre liquid diet, and improved my day to day life a thousand percent! GO ME!
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Luckily for me, I’m still well enough to socialise with my gorgeous friends. Things really cannot be that bad when you’re hanging out with beauties like this!

The last thing I wanted to address was something in the news earlier in the week – an article on ‘clean eating becoming a fad which is seen as cool’. Chef Ruth Rogers, founder of The River Cafe, worries young girls see clean eating as a ‘cool diet’ and will be excluding food groups without knowledge of what they’re doing and why.
Read full article Daily Telegraph article here.
I have to say, that even though I’ve taken on many elements of the clean eating/paleo diet, I do agree with some of the things she says. Excluding food groups shouldn’t be done because it’s seen as cool or ‘current’ – it’s about what feels right for you. It worries me that young girls might be afraid to eat a donut because ‘it’s not cool to eat gluten’. I would eat all the donuts in town if it didn’t give me awful pain!! It’s all about balance, moderation and getting enough nutrients from all your food groups. This includes carb and protein – as well as vital vitamins and minerals. Having said that, I absolutely adore my food and I am also enjoying the feeling of a pain free life. If clean eating is helping me get there, then I am not ashamed at all! Choosing what you eat is about feeling good and doing what is right for your body. NOT BECAUSE IT IS COOL.
Feel I got a lot off my chest there 🙂
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It’s Thursday 19th May and it’s World IBD Day. A day of raising awareness of Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Even if you don’t know much about it, chances are you know someone who suffers from it! Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis are the two main forms of Inflammatory Bowel Disease, affecting more than 300,000 people in the UK – that’s a lot!! To learn more about IBD and Crohn’s Disease, click here Day 13: Let’s get medical.
Of course – I’m doing my bit to raise awareness (apart from always writing about it!).In July, I will be running the London British Vitality 10k for Crohn’s and Colitis UK. It’s not a marathon, or even a half marathon – but given everything my body has been through, it’s a pretty big deal to me! If you have a penny to spare, visit my Justgiving page- Bryony & Josh run 10k.

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Find more information of IBD at Crohns and Colitis UK, website above

Today we’re facing the truths of the LOFFLEX Diet. I’ve been back on solid food for nearly three weeks now, yet I am ploughing through the LOFFLEX diet at a snails pace. Literally. The LOFFLEX Diet stands for Low Fat Reduced Fibre Diet, so we’re talking bland. Bland bland bland. The plan initially was to just stay on the LOFFLEX diet for two weeks after the liquid diet (elemental is still living strong btw!). Here’s a snapshot of my current yes list -foods that I’m tolerating well:
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I am totally coco for coconut at the moment

  • White fish and salmon
  • Prawns and crayfish. All other shellfish okay
  • Chicken
  • Olive oil
  • Lightly salted kettle chips
  • Vegetables – carrot, kale, courgette, green beans, butternut squash, ginger, red cabbage, aubergine, herbs (dry or fresh)
  • Salad – lettuce, cucumber, pepper, avocado, beetroot
  • Soya butter
  • Rice cakes, rice, rice based thins, rice noodles
  • Tamari (wheat free soya sauce)
  • Humus
  • Potato – mashed, boiled, jacket, fried
  • Sweet potato – jacket, baked
  • Coconut milk, yogurt and coconut pieces
  • Cacao
  • Maple syrup
  • Honey
  • Seedless jam
  • Mint tea

Foods that haven’t gone well so far:

  • Quinoa flakes
  • Apple
  • Alcohol! 🙁

As I sent this list of to my fabulous dietician auntie ahead of our catch up, I knew I wasn’t ready to start trying the more difficult foods (we’re talking dairy, gluten, oats). As she rightly pointed out, I hadn’t even tried half the other foods included in the LOFFLEX diet manual (lamb, beef, duck etc). For the full diet booklet, click here.
‘Are you scared?’ she asked me. I suddenly realised I was. Having now experienced first hand that I have some control over whether I am in pain, I am EXTREMELY reluctant to try anything new. Because let’s face it, when is actually a good time to have terrible stomach pain? This is a fairly ridiculous way to continue, I’m scared of food??! I didn’t see that one coming – given the volumes I would consume before. In light of this severely low fat diet, I have also lost 5 lbs. Whilst this may signal a woohooo for many – this is not a good sign. Especially as I train for a 10k run! So the elemental intake increases! And I have been tasked with trying four new things: tomato, garlic, lamb and a boiled egg. I know – my life is pretty rock and roll right now.

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Does this girl with A BIB on look scared of food?!!?

So the roller coaster continues, and I’m still having good days and bad days. Despite the blandness of my current diet, it has forced me to be creative with what I can eat. Look out for the next blog post where I’ll be sharing some of my LOFFLEX hints, tips and recipes.IMG_3107
 

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Day 28 and I’VE DONE IT. I’ve completed the month… and oh my god. It feels AMAZING! I would apologise unreservedly for the delay in this blog post – but I’ve been enjoying my first weekend of (some) food far far too much!

On Friday evening I had my first solid food and the first taste really was the sweetest. I have to be honest – I was worried about starting to eat again. The devil in my brain was telling me that as soon as I started eating again everything would instantly unravel. Once I had that first mouthful, I literally didn’t care. I died and went to potato heaven! I have never ever appreciated how fluffy and warm the inside of a potato could be!

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Genuinely the best thing I’ve ever tasted

Before we all get over excited – the diet I’m on now is bland with a capital B. And I haven’t quite waved goodbye to my beloved Elemental, it remains a staple snack for now. This next part of food introduction is absolutely crucial to remaining well. For the next two weeks I will be eating something called a LOFFLEX diet – the Low Fat Fibre Limited Exclusion Diet. Which in layman’s terms, means I’m on a diet of peeled veg and rice cakes! (Not that I’m complaining!!) The diet was formulated by dieticians working at Addenbrookes NHS Trust in Cambridge, were they poured tonnes of money and resources into the effectiveness of an exclusive elemental diet for Crohn’s patients. The LOFFLEX diet excludes typically troublesome foods (wheat, dairy) and also products which are hard to digest (heavily fibrous foods like lentils, beans, veg with pips, sweetcorn etc). After doing this for two weeks – and everything is still going well – you introduce other foods and see if you get a reaction – such as eggs, onion, oats, wheat, alcohol (booo!).. the list goes on and on! So I could well end up with a completely different diet at the end of this… For more information on the LOFFLEX diet, click here.

Now we’ve got the boring medical stuff out of the way, let’s talk about the amazing things I did eat AND appreciate this weekend! (No juicy steaks or Starbucks here unfortunately) Saturday morning I enjoyed a gorgeous Pukka mint tea with rice cakes (which I am surprisingly enjoying!).

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Bland = yum

Unfortunately, the Elemental lives on for now. It’s the perfect way to bridge the gaps between some of my meals in the early stages of food introduction – and keep the hunger at bay when I’m out and about and don’t have a rice cake or peeled potato to hand!

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Which means I continue to be the boring sober one.. and the designated driver!

Yesterday I went to an actual restaurant. I went to an actual restaurant with actual people and sat down for a meal – something I haven’t done in far too long! Navigating my way around the menu was a total minefield, as I don’t fall into any single category like gluten free, vegan or vegetarian. I finally selected a salad, but still had to be the person who said ‘can I have it without the nuts, and without the dressing, and without the pumpkin seeds… in fact, can I jut have a plate of lettuce??!!’ My stomach has shrunk to the size of a pea, so I only managed half of this plateful. I relished every mouthful though!!
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Interestingly, I have felt noticeably more relaxed this weekend. I didn’t even realise how tense I felt all the time, constantly making sure I didn’t give in to the temptation of food. Willpower is tiring! Of course, not being in pain is also a massive relaxant!
As I said above, my journey is nowhere near over. I’m not saying this liquid diet will keep me well for years,  maybe not even months, (Crohn’s has a habit of sneaking up when you least expect it), but I feel extremely optimistic. It has opened my eyes up to so much more – more than I ever could have imagined. After the appointment with my consultant where I took matter into my own hands, by putting the liquid diet on the table and refusing steroids, I called my Mum in floods of tears. Have I made the right decision?! What if it doesn’t work??!! Why am I taking matter into my own hands when I’m not even a doctor!? Now I know I 100% made the right decision. I am reading books I never thought I’d read (list of recommended reads below) and I’m finding new ways to keep my symptoms at bay without being at the mercy of toxic drugs – something I felt only 4 weeks ago.
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Now that is a HEALTHY food shop!

If you’re reading this with Crohn’s or Colitis and are suffering a bad flare – I would urge you to suggest a liquid diet to your consultant. It is not used widely in adults as patients often struggle with compliance. Yes, it requires a hell of a lot of willpower. But the results are so worth it – without any nasty side effects. Read on below for a list of books which will totally get you thinking in a different way.
Lots of people have asked me if the blog will continue past the liquid diet – and the answer is of course YES! I’ve loved writing the blog and seeing the positive feedback from sharing my story. I will continue to write through this transitional period and share any hints and tips I pick up along the way! After that, thefoodfree blog will change guise – so watch this space!!
I also must say a big thank you to everyone who has been following my journey. Thank you for the love and support (and donations!) – I can’t even put into words how much it means to me.
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Love, (a very happy and healthy)
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Recommended reads:

  • Mind over Medicine by Dr Lissa Rankin – will completely change your thinking towards your illness
  • Crazy Sexy Diet by Kris Carr – hear from amazing Kris Carr, cancer survivor and wellness warrior
  • Deliciously Ella Everyday – tonnes of fabulous plant based recipes for Eleanor Woodward, who ate herself back to health
  • Get The Glow by Madeleine Shaw – more amazing healthy recipes
  • Juice by Liz Earle – the beginners guide to juicing
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